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Archive for the ‘Women’s Problems’ Category

Menopausal Problems

In Women's Problems on December 5, 2007 at 2:44 pm

The menopause or a woman’s change of life is a perfectly normal event which occurs in the mid or late forties. It signifies the end of the female reproductive period of life which commenced at adolescence in the early teens.

There are several misconceptions about menopause. Many women at this time feel that they are growing old and that they are well past their full physical vigour. Other women feel that the menopause brings a cessation of sexual pleasure. These apprehensions are far from true.

Menopause may be considered an end to women’s fertility but certainly not to her virility. It does not decrease a woman’s physical capacity or sexual vigour or enjoyment.

Symptoms

During the menopause, the entire chain of endocrine glands is disturbed, particularly the gonads, thyroid and pituitary. In a really healthy woman, the menopausal change takes place without any unpleasant symptoms. The only sign that the “change ” taking place is the cessation of menstrual flow. There are, however, many women who do not enjoy good health due to dietetic errors and a faulty style of living. In these cases, the menopausal change often leads to all kinds of distressing physical, emotional and nervous symptoms and manifestations.

Hot flashes, night sweats, nervous tension, menstrual disturbances, insomnia, diminished interest in sex, irritability and depression are the typical symptoms of menopause. Other symptoms are chilly feelings, fatigue, palpitation, dizziness, headaches and numbness. Not every women will get these severe reactions. The severity or otherwise of the symptoms depend on a variety of factors such as general health, previous surgery and radiation. Menopause and its problems are usually over when menstruation stops.

Causes

The annoying symptoms associated with menopause arise from the fact that the ovaries are no longer producing their normal amount of estrogen, the dominant female hormone. Anything which interferes with the normal functioning of the ovaries may also bring about these symptoms. The same strange feelings may occur if the ovaries are removed by surgery because of disease. This can also result from heavy X-ray therapy or the use of radiation.

A lack of normal hormone balance may also result in a severe backache. This is caused by thinning of the bones arising from the low level of estrogen in the bloodstream. Unless properly treated, this may eventually lead to a collapse of one or more of the vertebrae.

Treatment

Although menopause cannot be avoided, it can be postponed for as long as 10 to 15 years and it can be made a smooth affair when it comes, with a proper nutritional programme, special supplements and the right mental attitude.

When a woman is affected by the menopausal change to any marked extent, it is a sure sign that her body is in a toxic condition and in need of a thorough cleansing. For this purpose, she should undergo a course of natural health building treatment.

Diet is of utmost importance in such a scheme of treatment. In fact the problems at menopause are often much more severe than that at puberty largely because the diet has been deficient for many years prior to its onset, in many nutrients such as protein, calcium, magnesium, vitamins D, E and pantothenic acid.

The diet should be made up from three basic food groups, namely

(i) seeds, nuts and grains

(ii) vegetables and

(iii) fruits. The emphasis should be on vitamin E-rich raw and sprouted seeds and nuts, unpasteurised high quality milk and home-made cottage cheese and an abundance of raw, organically grown fruits and vegetables. Plenty of freshly made juices of fruits and vegetables in season should also be included in this diet.

All processed, refined and denatured foods, such as white sugar, white flour and all articles made with them, should be completely eliminated. Take special supplements such as vitamins C, B6 and pantothenic acid, which have a specific property of stimulating the body’s own production of estrogen or enhancing the effect of the existing estrogen.

During menopause, the lack of ovarian hormones can result in a severe calcium deficiency. For this reason, a larger than usual intake of calcium may help greatly. Vitamins D and F are also essential for assimilation of calcium. Any woman having difficulty at this time should supplement her daily diet with 1,000 units of natural vitamin D, 5000 milligrams of magnesium and two grams of calcium daily, which can be supplied by one quart of milk.

During the manopause, the need for vitamin E soars 10 to 50 times over that previously required. Hot flashes, night sweats and other symptoms of menopause often disappear when 50 to 100 units of vitamin E are taken daily. The symptoms recur quickly if the vitamin is discontinued.

Of late, it has become popular to take estrogen to prevent or postpone menopausal symptoms. Although hormone therapy is apparently successful and will, in many cases, help the patient to feel and act younger, it cannot be recommended in all cases because of its carcinogenic effect.

If, however, estrogen therapy is undertaken, it should never be administered at the same time as vitamin E therapy. Ingestion of estrogen and vitamin E should be seperated by several hours.

Beet juice has been found very useful in menopausal disorders. It should be taken in small quantities of 60 to 90 ml at a time thrice a day. It has proved much more permanently helpful than the degenerative effects of drugs or synthetic hormones.

Carrot seeds have also been found valuable in menopausal tension. A teaspoonful of the seeds should be boiled in a glassful of cow’s milk for about 10 minutes and taken daily as a medicine in this condition.

Plenty of outdoor exercise, such as walking, joggng, swimming, horse-riding or cycling, is imperative to postpone menopause. Other helpful measures in this direction are avoiding mental and emotional stress and worries, especially worry about growing old, sufficient sleep and relaxation and following all general rules of maintaining a high level of health. The healthier a woman is, the fewer menopausal symptoms she will experience.

The menopause can be made a pleasant affair by building bodily health and a sane mental outlook. From puberty to menoapuse , a woman has been somewhat of a slave to her female glands. At specified intervals she was inconvenienced by her menstural periods. She bore children, enduring the pain and discomfort of pregnancy. Menopause relieves her of this bondage to her femininity. She can now experience some of the happiest days of a woman’s life.

A whole new life is given to her, if she is wise enough to prepare for it and accept it as such.

Premenstrual Syndrome

In Women's Problems on December 5, 2007 at 2:43 pm

The premenstrual syndrome (PMS) refers to a variety of symptoms which recur in the same phase of the menstrual cycle. These generally make their appearance two to seven days before the onset of menstruation and are relieved once the menses start.

Approximately , 40 per cent of menstruating women suffer from premenstrual tension and it occurs mostly in women over 30 years of age. IN some women, the onset of symptoms seems to coincide with ovulation and may then persist until menstruation commences. IN some rare cases, relief from the premenstrual syndrome may be obtained only with the cessation of the menstrual flow.

Symptoms

The onset of this syndrome is abrupt, generally with a headache which is often accompanied by vomiting. A general feeling of depression and irritability permeate the entire experience. What is worse, these symptoms intensify progressively, making the last day of the PMS the worst.

Tension headaches are common during this period, but in some cases, migraines attacks occur with severe pain and vomiting. The patient suffers from breast tenderness, which is sometimes so severe that it is almost unbearable. There may also be abdominal bloating , accompanied in some cases, by odema of the ankles and hands. Some women resort to dieting to get rid of the abodminal bloating but this only leads to fatigue and depression. Others may experience a craving for sweet foods.

Some of the less common symptoms are exacerbation of epilepsy dizziness, back ache, hoarse voice, greasy hair , acne and allergic reactions.

Patients suffering from premenstrual tension may show a gain of weight of one kg or more in the latter part of the menstrual cycle due to salt and water retention. The retention of fluid is partly due to ovarian steroids, but there is also an increased output of anti diuretic hormone from the posterior pituitary gland.

Diagnosis

There is no specific laboratory diagnosis of the premenstrual syndrome. The problem can be diagnosed on the basis of past history showing a clear, recurrent relationship between a stage of the menstrual cycle and the onset of symptoms as well as the coincidence of relief with the start or cessation of menstruation. The patient may maintain a personal diary about her symptoms and feelings during those days. The record should be kept for atleast three cycles.

Causes

The causes behind the premenstrual syndrome still remain unexplained. Some authorities believe that deficiency of hormone progesterone may result in PMS but this has not yet been satisfactorily proved. Emotional stress can often contribute to the symptoms, and the social relationship of the patient needs to be reviewed.

A team of researchers at Sinai Hospital in Baltimore and John Hopkins University School of Medicine, London, through carefully controlled studies concluded that dietary deficiencies particularly that of vitamin E and vitamin B6 or pyridoxine are the most common causes of PMS.

Treatment

Treatment depends on the severity of the symptoms. Where only mild symptoms are experienced , the problem can be elevated by a change of routine. Extra work and stressful situation should be avoided. Fluids should be moderately restricted and care should be taken not to add extra salt to the food. The patient’s partner and family members should be educated about all the facets of the PMS. The patient should not take any oral contraceptives as these may cause fluid retention and lowering the plasma levels. Hormonal imbalance and infections of the uterus can be helped by a natural diet regimen.

As most women feel tension arising from chronic constipation it is essential to treat this condition first. In constipation, the putrefying faecal matter may be reabsorbed into the bloodstead, and the same blood, if supplied to the brain, will cause gradual enervation. Constipation can be relieved by a lukewarm water enema and liberal intake of seasonal fruits and vegetables and simple fibrous meals.

Other treatment for the PMS include regular cold hip baths for 10 to 15 minutes twice a day. This will congestion and inflammation of the uterus and connected organs. Tension will also be dissipated with this treatment. Hot foot baths followed by a cold compress to the lower abdomen and the inner surfaces of the thighs also help to relieve uterine congestion and tension.

If the cold hip bath is not practicable, a wet girdle pack applied twice a day on empty stomach is very beneficial for clearing up uterine congestion and improving bowel function.

All these statements should be suspended during the menstrual flow.

Diet pays a significant role in preventing premenstrual syndrome. The patient should avoid refined carbohydrates, sugars, coffee, tea, tobacco, other stimulants, oily, fried or spicy food and all meats.

A regular practice of yogasanas, especially those recommended for strengthening the genito-urinary system will be very useful in overcoming premenstrual syndrome. These asanas are bhujangasana, shalabhasana, vajrasana, paschimotanasana, ardhamatsyendrasana and trikonasana. Other helpful measures are brisk walks and abdominal exercises which are good for strengthening the abdominal muscles and pelvic organs.

Great relief can also be obtained by manipulating the tender points gently, on the big as well as other toes of the feet. Manipulation on the middle portion of the leg foot which relates the uterus and vagina will help to correct the disorder of the uterus.

Mental poise is an important factor. Negative mental attitudes like fear, worry, anger, jealousy , tension and inferiority complex should be eliminated by positive thinking, meditation and good company.

The premenstrual syndrome (PMS) refers to a variety of symptoms which recur in the same phase of the menstrual cycle. These generally make their appearance two to seven days before the onset of menstruation and are relieved once the menses start.

Approximately , 40 per cent of menstruating women suffer from premenstrual tension and it occurs mostly in women over 30 years of age. IN some women, the onset of symptoms seems to coincide with ovulation and may then persist until menstruation commences. IN some rare cases, relief from the premenstrual syndrome may be obtained only with the cessation of the menstrual flow.

Symptoms

The onset of this syndrome is abrupt, generally with a headache which is often accompanied by vomiting. A general feeling of depression and irritability permeate the entire experience. What is worse, these symptoms intensify progressively, making the last day of the PMS the worst.

Tension headaches are common during this period, but in some cases, migraines attacks occur with severe pain and vomiting. The patient suffers from breast tenderness, which is sometimes so severe that it is almost unbearable. There may also be abdominal bloating , accompanied in some cases, by odema of the ankles and hands. Some women resort to dieting to get rid of the abodminal bloating but this only leads to fatigue and depression. Others may experience a craving for sweet foods.

Some of the less common symptoms are exacerbation of epilepsy dizziness, back ache, hoarse voice, greasy hair , acne and allergic reactions.

Patients suffering from premenstrual tension may show a gain of weight of one kg or more in the latter part of the menstrual cycle due to salt and water retention. The retention of fluid is partly due to ovarian steroids, but there is also an increased output of anti diuretic hormone from the posterior pituitary gland.

Diagnosis

There is no specific laboratory diagnosis of the premenstrual syndrome. The problem can be diagnosed on the basis of past history showing a clear, recurrent relationship between a stage of the menstrual cycle and the onset of symptoms as well as the coincidence of relief with the start or cessation of menstruation. The patient may maintain a personal diary about her symptoms and feelings during those days. The record should be kept for atleast three cycles.

Causes

The causes behind the premenstrual syndrome still remain unexplained. Some authorities believe that deficiency of hormone progesterone may result in PMS but this has not yet been satisfactorily proved. Emotional stress can often contribute to the symptoms, and the social relationship of the patient needs to be reviewed.

A team of researchers at Sinai Hospital in Baltimore and John Hopkins University School of Medicine, London, through carefully controlled studies concluded that dietary deficiencies particularly that of vitamin E and vitamin B6 or pyridoxine are the most common causes of PMS.

Treatment

Treatment depends on the severity of the symptoms. Where only mild symptoms are experienced , the problem can be elevated by a change of routine. Extra work and stressful situation should be avoided. Fluids should be moderately restricted and care should be taken not to add extra salt to the food. The patient’s partner and family members should be educated about all the facets of the PMS. The patient should not take any oral contraceptives as these may cause fluid retention and lowering the plasma levels. Hormonal imbalance and infections of the uterus can be helped by a natural diet regimen.

As most women feel tension arising from chronic constipation it is essential to treat this condition first. In constipation, the putrefying faecal matter may be reabsorbed into the bloodstead, and the same blood, if supplied to the brain, will cause gradual enervation. Constipation can be relieved by a lukewarm water enema and liberal intake of seasonal fruits and vegetables and simple fibrous meals.

Other treatment for the PMS include regular cold hip baths for 10 to 15 minutes twice a day. This will congestion and inflammation of the uterus and connected organs. Tension will also be dissipated with this treatment. Hot foot baths followed by a cold compress to the lower abdomen and the inner surfaces of the thighs also help to relieve uterine congestion and tension.

If the cold hip bath is not practicable, a wet girdle pack applied twice a day on empty stomach is very beneficial for clearing up uterine congestion and improving bowel function.

All these statements should be suspended during the menstrual flow.

Diet pays a significant role in preventing premenstrual syndrome. The patient should avoid refined carbohydrates, sugars, coffee, tea, tobacco, other stimulants, oily, fried or spicy food and all meats.

A regular practice of yogasanas, especially those recommended for strengthening the genito-urinary system will be very useful in overcoming premenstrual syndrome. These asanas are bhujangasana, shalabhasana, vajrasana, paschimotanasana, ardhamatsyendrasana and trikonasana. Other helpful measures are brisk walks and abdominal exercises which are good for strengthening the abdominal muscles and pelvic organs.

Great relief can also be obtained by manipulating the tender points gently, on the big as well as other toes of the feet. Manipulation on the middle portion of the leg foot which relates the uterus and vagina will help to correct the disorder of the uterus.

Mental poise is an important factor. Negative mental attitudes like fear, worry, anger, jealousy , tension and inferiority complex should be eliminated by positive thinking, meditation and good company.

Menstrual Disorders

In Women's Problems on December 5, 2007 at 2:41 pm

The maternal instincts of a woman arise almost entirely from the female hormones within her body. These hormes are produced in a pair of almond-shaped organs, known as the ovaries.

They are situated deep within the pelvis, one on each side of the uterus or womb. The two major female hormones are estrogen and pro-gestrone. These hormones give the woman strength and stamina and are largely responsible for the peculiarly feminine shape of her body. The ovaries start producing large quantities of estrogen, the dominant female hormone when a girl reaches about 12 years of age. This enables her to grow rapidly and develop into a normal young woman. The commencement of menstruation at this time heralds the reproductive phase of her life, when she can have children. This phase may last for about 35 years.

The menstrual flow is connected with the female function of ovaluation or the passing of the egg cell or ovum from the ovary to the womb ready for fertilisation. It is a provision of nature to cleanse the inner surface of the womb and enable reproduction to take place normally. The flow normally lasts for about four days and has a rhythm of 28 days.

The main problem relating to menstrual flow are painful menstruation, stoppage of menstruation and excessive menstruation, besides pre-menstrual tension which is discussed in the next chapter (84). These disorders are quite common, but they are not normal. Healthy women, living according to natural laws and eating diets of natural foods do not suffer from the monthly ordeal.

Most menstrual disorders are caused by nutritional deficiencies which lead to deficiency and improper metabolism of the female sex hormones. These disorders are now discussed briefly.

Dysmenorrhoea : Painful menstruation or dysmenorrhoea, as it is called in medical parlance, is a very common occurrence these days. This disorder is traceable to a debilitated and toxic condition of the system in general and of the sex organs in particular due to a wrong diet, wrong style of living and nervous exhaustion. The pain may be felt either two or three days before or immediately before or during the flow.

Pain starting two or three days before the flow usually shows that the ovaries are not functioning properly. This is a glandular misfunction and a carefully planned natural diet will usually put matters right. For local treatment, hot sip baths on alternate nights for a week before the period is due will be highly beneficial. Between periods, cold hip baths will increase the tone of the ovaries.

Pain immediately before the flow commences is indicative of uterine flexion, which means that

the position of the womb is abnormal. A professional examination should be arranged to ascertain the position of the womb and corrective exercises undertaken under professional advice. Uterine flexion often occurs in women who are so thin that they have lost internal fat and the ligament, on which the womb is suspended. General treatment along dietetic lines is essential along with corrective exercises.

When the pain occurs during menstruation, it usually means that the womb itself is inflammed. This condition can be relieved by proper attention to diet and hot hip baths just before the period is due and cold hip baths between the periods. The hot hip bath is generally taken for eight to ten minutes at a water temperature of 100 o F which can be gradually increased to 120 o F. The cold hip bath should be taken for 10 to 15 minutes at a water temperature of 50 o F to 65 o F.

Amenorrhoea or stoppage of menstrual flow : Stoppage of menstruation is natural during pregnancy and at the menopause, but abnormal at any other time. It is true that some women have very infrequent periods but this seems to be peculiar to their particular type and cannot be termed as stoppage. If , however, the periods have been quite regular for a number of years and then suddenly stop or the cycle becomes frequently interrupted, it denotes a debilitated and devitalised condition of the system, especially of the sex organ. Causes contributing towards this condition are anaemia, worry, grief, fright or other serious emotional disturbances, malformation of the womb, tuberculosis, displacement of womb and debility, especially after a serious illness.

The treatment for amenorrhoea should be directed towards the rectification of the disease-condition responsible for causing the trouble in the first place. Along with this, a course of general health-building treatment should also be carried out. If serious emotional disturbance has caused the trouble, an initial period of quietness and rest is essential to the treatment. All excitement, excessive mental strain and study should be avoided for a considerable period.

Menorrhoea or excessive menstruation : Profuse menstrual flow is common in certain women and usually denotes a blood deficiency, especially blood calcium. A variety of causes may be responsible for this trouble, but toxic condition of the system is at the root of the matter. It is essential to keep the patient absolutely quiet and confined to bed. The bottom of the bed should be raised 10 cm to 13 cm. IN case of excessive bleeding, a gauze may be inserted in the vagina as a temporary measure.

For the first few days the diet should consist only of milk and raw vegetables. No stimulants should be taken as they tend to increase the flow. When the bleeding has stopped, great care should be taken to avoid over exertion or straining the body in any manner. A full nature cure diet should then be adopted using fresh vegetables raw salads twice daily. As a long term measure, what is needed is a scheme of treatment which will thoroughly cleanse the system of toxic material.

Treatment

The various disorders relating to menstrual flow are indicative of the low level of a woman’s health and a toxic condition of her sex organism, which has been brought about by wrong habits of living, especially wrong dietary habits. These disorders are made more deep-seated and chronic by modern medical efforts to deal with them through the suppressive agency of surgery and drugs. The disorders being systemic in origin, can be tackled only by treating the system as a whole so as to remove the toxicity from the body and build up the general health-level of the sufferer.

To undertake such a scheme of all round health-building treatment, the sufferer from menstrual disorders should begin with an all-fruit diet for about five days. In this regimen, the patient should have three meals a day of fresh, juicy fruits, such as apples, pears, grapes, papaya, oranges, pineapple, peaches and melon. No other foodstuff should be taken; otherwise the value of the whole treatment will be lost. However, if there is much weight loss on the all-fruit diet, those already underweight may add a glass of milk to each fruit meal. During this period the bowels should be cleansed daily with a warm water enema.

After the all-fruit diet, the sufferer should adopt a well- balanced diet on the following lines :

Upon rising : A glass of lukewarm water mixed with the freshly squeezed juice of half a lime and a spoon of honey.

Breakfast : Fresh fruits such as apple, orange, grapes, papaya, banana and milk.

Lunch : A bowl of freshly prepared steamed vegetable such as carrot , cabbage, cauliflower, swuash, and beans, two or three whole wheat chappatis.

Mid-afternoon : A glass of carrot juice or sugarcane juice.

Dinner : A large bowl of fresh green vegetable salad using all available vegetable such as carrot, cabbage, cucumber, tomatoes, radish, red beets and onion and mung bean sprouts.

Bed-time snack : A glass of fresh milk or an apple.

The diet factor is of the utmost importance. Fruits and salads ,nature’s body-cleansing and health-restoring foods, must form the bulk of the future diet along with whole grains, nuts and seeds, especially in sprouted forms. Frequent small meals should be taken instead of few large ones to prevent low blood sugar which is common during menstruation. The foods which should be avoided in future are white-flour products, sugar, confectionery, rich cakes, pastries, sweets, refined cereals, flesh foods, rich, heavy, or greasy foods, tinned or preserved foods, strong tea, coffee, pickles, condiments and sauces. Smoking, if habitual, should be given up completely as it aggravates menstrual disorders.

A further short period on all -fruit , say two or three consecutive days can be undertaken at monthly intervals, according to the need of the case. The morning dry friction and cold hip baths should form a regular feature of the treatment. All cold baths should however , be suspended during the menstrual period.

Certain remedies have been found useful in menstrual disorders. Cooked banana flower eaten with curd is one of the more important of such remedies. The banana flower appears to increase progesterone hormone and reduce the bleeding.

Beet juice has been found very effective for menstrual disorders. It should be used in small quantities of 60 to 90 grams, at a time two or three times a day in these conditions.

Coriander seeds are highly beneficial in the treatment of excessive menstruation. Six gramsof these seeds should be boiled in half a litre of water. It should be taken off the fire when only half the water remains. Sugar candy should be added to it and the patient should drink it when it is still warm.

Ginger has been useful in menstrual disorders. A piece of fresh ginger should be pounded and boiled in a cupful of water for few minutes. The infection sweetened with sugar should be used thrice daily after meals as a medicine for dysmenorrhoea, and amenorrhoea due to exposure to cold winds and taking cold baths.

Sesame seeds are also useful in menstrual disorders. Half a teaspoonful of powder of these seeds taken with hot water twice daily acts excellently in reducing spasmodic pain during menstruation in young unmarried anaemic girls. Its regular use, two days prior to the expected periods, cures scanty menstruation. Warm hip bath containing a handful of bruised sesame seeds should be simultaneously taken along with this receipt.

Safflower seeds have also been found to be beneficial in the treatment of painful menstruation.

A decoction prepared by boiling two teaspoonfulsof powdered seeds in 120 ml. of water should be given as a remedy for this condition. Dried flowers mixed with confection of rose can also be given as a medicine for this purpose.